Saturday, September 29, 2012

Monitor My Funds

In order to track the performance of my mutual funds, I have an email in draft mode where I write down the date I bought in, the number of shares and the NAVPS at that time. I would then check out the current NAVPS over at Sun Life or FAMI and then compute the value of my shares. It's a very low-tech system but it gets the job done. However, The Thrifty Chick showed me a much better and more efficient way to monitor my funds, through a website aptly named: Monitor My Funds.

The premise is very simple and upfront:

Monitor My Funds allows you to keep track of the values of mutual funds and UITFs. You can see the past performances of funds in graphs. You can create an account and track all your funds in a single page. Check out the demo here
Registration is also easy and takes all of 30 seconds.


 To start, click the Add Fund to Portfolio link and input the necessary information.


I have made several investments in my Sun Life Balanced Fund for the past 2 years and you can see the corresponding gains/loss per investment made as well as the total gains.

 I've only made one investment with First Metro Save and Learn Equity Fund, so that row is basically it.

Monitor My Funds also has a compare funds feature so you can see the past performance of the different funds.



And that's that. Nothing like technology to make life a little easier.

Monitor My Funds

In order to track the performance of my mutual funds, I have an email in draft mode where I write down the date I bought in, the number of shares and the NAVPS at that time. I would then check out the current NAVPS over at Sun Life or FAMI and then compute the value of my shares. It's a very low-tech system but it gets the job done. However, The Thrifty Chick showed me a much better and more efficient way to monitor my funds, through a website aptly named: Monitor My Funds.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

One for all and all for one!

*Originally posted in Kikay Exchange.


I rarely get tapped to write a sponsored post, so when I was asked to write about Sun Life Financial's latest short film Sun Dance, on a topic that was very close to my heart (personal finance), all I could think of was: "This is great! Thank you Sun Life for subsidizing my next Maxi Prime premium payment!":p

When I first started reading about personal finance about two years ago, I was amazed at the wealth of information available. I would usually browse through the personal finance topics in Yahoo Finance and my favorite topic then was how to pay off my credit card debts as quickly as possible (two words: Snowball Method). I also got hooked on personal blogs where people openly talked about their household budgets, how they save on money without cutting out fun from their life. In short, I was getting into the frugal lifestyle and seeing that it wasn't that bad after all.

And soon enough, the random chitchat with my friends turned into long talks on investments, how we manage our respective households, what bank gives out the best housing loan rates etc. In short, we were on full-on adult mode and I couldn't have been happier. It was nice to have a support group both online and in real life whom I could talk with.

When I watched Sun Dance, I was reminded of my own friends and the personal finance community. No, we don't prance around restaurants like Ina Feliciano and her friends, but we're also always on the lookout for each other and always willing to share our knowledge and experiences, believing that financial success is not just for a chosen few but for everyone to enjoy. Besides, think of how lonely your journey to financial freedom will be if you were to travel solo.


My favorite local finance experts/bloggers seem to be genuinely nice people who are motivated by a sincere desire to spread the gospel of financial success as everyone's right. I am humbled at how accommodating they are and how willing to help out newbies such as myself, proving that the more successful you get, the more light you emit for others to follow.

Enjoy the Sun short and remember that when it comes to financial freedom, first you must believe that it's yours for the taking and then everything else will fall smoothly into place.

*To know how life can be even brighter, please visit the website www.experiencethesun.com.ph
** Sun Life is having a flyaway promo to Singapore, please click here for more details.

One for all and all for one!

*Originally posted in Kikay Exchange.


I rarely get tapped to write a sponsored post, so when I was asked to write about Sun Life Financial's latest short film Sun Dance, on a topic that was very close to my heart (personal finance), all I could think of was: "This is great! Thank you Sun Life for subsidizing my next Maxi Prime premium payment!":p

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Investing in Luxury




An investment is simply defined as putting in money or capital in order to gain profitable returns, as interest, income, or appreciation in value. That's why I always wondered about women who buy expensive bags and shoes and declare them as "investments". Do these really appreciate in value? 


Investing in Luxury


An investment is simply defined as putting in money or capital in order to gain profitable returns, as interest, income, or appreciation in value. That's why I always wondered about women who buy expensive bags and shoes and declare them as "investments". Do these really appreciate in value? 

Sunday, September 9, 2012

Meralco bill update


I wrote about getting an inverter aircon in this past post, and after much soul and wallet searching, we finally bought a Koppel 1 HP unit from SM Appliances.

The unit cost Php27,495, but we made use of SM's deferred payment plan, staggering the price to 6 monthly installments of Php4,582.50. I honestly thought the unit would run up to Php40,000, so paying "only" Php27,495 was a very pleasant surprise. What really hurt though was the Php7,500 installation fee that we had to pay upfront. Ouch.


Anyway, our Meralco bill arrived 2 weeks ago and there really was a decrease in our monthly electricity consumption. Take note of our July bill:



Now our August bill:



From Php4,228.85 (333kWh), our bill went down to Php3,436.80 (272 kWh)! That's a difference of Php792 :)

Admittedly, I expected more savings than that, but I remember that August was the month my hubby was bedridden for almost a week and spent most of his days watching TV. This month, our TV routine is back to normal, so I'm crossing my fingers that our Meralco bill will go down even further.

For even more good news, electricity rates are supposed to go down by Php1.73 per kWh this month (read news article here) leading to a potential savings of Php470 for our household (Php1.73 x 272 kWh) :) I'm hoping to whittle down our electricity bill to Php2,500/mo. and let it stay there for good. Hooray for saving money!

Meralco bill update


I wrote about getting an inverter aircon in this past post, and after much soul and wallet searching, we finally bought a Koppel 1 HP unit from SM Appliances.

The unit cost Php27,495, but we made use of SM's deferred payment plan, staggering the price to 6 monthly installments of Php4,582.50. I honestly thought the unit would run up to Php40,000, so paying "only" Php27,495 was a very pleasant surprise. What really hurt though was the Php7,500 installation fee that we had to pay upfront. Ouch.

Thursday, September 6, 2012

Thank goodness for emergency funds!

My husband's PC suddenly gave up on him a few days ago, giving off an ominous and high pitched "eeeeeeeeeeeeee" sound, and no amount of whacking or coaxing could get it to work again. That's the PC where he spends hours hunting and shooting down German soldiers and zombies, but it's also where he works on his projects and websites. In short, it was time to dip into our emergency funds to get a new motherboard and other what-have-yous for his down and out PC.


Thank goodness for emergency funds!

My husband's PC suddenly gave up on him a few days ago, giving off an ominous and high pitched "eeeeeeeeeeeeee" sound, and no amount of whacking or coaxing could get it to work again. That's the PC where he spends hours hunting and shooting down German soldiers and zombies, but it's also where he works on his projects and websites. In short, it was time to dip into our emergency funds to get a new motherboard and other what-have-yous for his down and out PC.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Lending Money to Friends and Relatives: More Harm than Good


This article from Learnvest brought back a barrage memories of the first and last time I acted as guarantor for my friends.

In my old law firm, one of our clients had an ex-deal with Gold's Gym and was paid with 1 year membership GCs redeemable at any Gold's Gym branch. Our client then sold these GCs for Php12,000 each, payable in 12 monthly installments. Of course I pounced on the deal and informed my friends about this fantastic offer from Gold's Gym. Several friends bought GCs and we agreed that they would pay me Php1,000 monthly for each GC, I would then remit the cash to the client every month.

Sad to say, of the 3 friends who got GCs through me, only 1 religiously paid every month. One always forgot it was that time of the month and the other lost her job and gave back her GC to me, promising to pay me back later.

The forgetful friend eventually did pay me, but only after I demanded the whole amount after he forgot for 2 straight months to remit his payment. The other friend still owes me money and from the looks of it, she has already wiped off that debt from her consciousness, even if she got a new job about 3 years ago.

I'm still friends with these two, but I will never, ever lend them money again or act as a guarantor for them, or for any other person, for that matter. The stress and disappointment are just not worth it. 

For me lending and borrowing money involves so much more than the actual value of the transaction, as it really boils down to respect. Do you as the borrower, respect the lender enough to make good on your word? Or will you just disregard the loan, reasoning that the lender has more than enough to not notice that she's out a few thousands of pesos?

I know money problems can't be avoided, but what you can control is how you will honor your word to someone you are indebted to.

Lending Money to Friends and Relatives: More Harm than Good


This article from Learnvest brought back a barrage memories of the first and last time I acted as guarantor for my friends.