Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Crazy Rich Fans


For the record, I have never bought anything from Shopee (I'm more of a Lazada and Zalora girl) and I don't know who Blackpink is, but the recent Shopee + Blackpink incident really piqued my interest because I couldn't fathom how kids could spend hundreds and thousands of pesos just to qualify for a contest. To be more specific, I couldn't understand how kids could spend hundreds and thousands of pesos, period.





Are kids these days richer than kids during my day? Or am I wrong to assume that Blackpink fans are kids? When I say kids, I'm thinking 21 years old below, about high school and college age, or have just entered the workforce.





Again, do kids in that age range already have the financial capacity to spend hundreds and thousands of pesos (or even just several thousands of pesos)? Or did they do this all on credit? Do banks give credit cards to kids?





It's ridiculous just how many questions I have.





I'm thinking of my pre-teen nieces and wondering if they're the only "impoverished" ones in their generation because kids just a few years older than them are already snapping up mobile phones and doodads on Shopee to meet their K-pop idols.





Whoever conducted the survey that revealed that a huge percent of Filipinos consider themselves poor, obviously didn't include K-pop fans in its survey.


3 comments:

  1. I understand that's the standard operation to get vip /meet and greet tickets to meet your fave kpop idol in Korea. Brilliant marketing strategy too.

    I constantly fear for my nephews' and niece's generation--and maybe for their parents who oblige them by giving them the money!

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  2. I don't know if the rates are just the same if adjusted for inflation, but not having the 500 pesos for Alanis or Cranberries tickets vs asking parents (and godparents) for 12,500-25k for Kpop tickets somehow seem as not equitable. Standard parent reply would have been: Money doesn't grow on trees.

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  3. When I was in college (early 2000s), I couldn't fathom how my classmates could have the money to watch ₱8k-peso concerts. Now fans spend so much more.

    I'm thinking this is the rich getting immensely richer and the poor poorer. It's still difficult to fathom in my reality, but I hope they actually have the money on hand and are not drowning in debt.

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